Emergency Medicine

/Emergency Medicine
Emergency Medicine 2017-05-30T14:30:00+00:00

Offering Emergency Care in Your Pet’s Time of Need

No pet parent likes to think about pet emergencies. But they do occur—and when emergency strikes, the staff here at All Bay Animal Hospital is ready.

We have the training, resources and experience to treat a wide range of emergency medical conditions. You’ll find our veterinarians and staff to be skilled and compassionate as they tend to your pet’s health and keep you comfortable in a stressful situation.

Of course, no one knows when an emergency will occur. If you have a pet emergency that occurs when our hospital is closed (at a time other than our regular business hours), bring your pet to:

SAGE Centers for Veterinary Specialty and Emergency Care
1410 Monument Blvd, Concord, CA
925-627-7243

If your pet has experienced some kind of trauma, such as being hit by a car or a blunt object or falling more than a few feet you need to come in immediately for our team to access your pet’s condition.

If you notice any of the following problems, bring your pet in immediately for emergency care.

  • Your pet isn’t breathing or you can’t feel a heartbeat.
  • Your pet is unconscious and won’t wake up.
  • Your pet has been vomiting or has had diarrhea for more than 24 hours, or your pet is vomiting blood.
  • You suspect any broken bones.
  • Your pet is having trouble breathing or has something stuck in the throat.
  • Your pet has had or is having a seizure.
  • Your pet is bleeding from the eyes, nose, or mouth, or there is blood in urine or feces.
  • You think your pet might have ingested something toxic, such as antifreeze, rat poison, any kind of medication that wasn’t prescribed, or household cleansers.
  • Your pet, particularly your male cat, is straining to urinate, or is unable to.
  • Your pet shows signs of extreme pain, such as whining, shaking, and refusing to socialize.
  • Your pet collapses or suddenly can’t stand up.
  • Your pet begins bumping into things or suddenly becomes disoriented.
  • You can see irritation or injury to your pet’s eyes, or suddenly seems to become blind.
  • Your pet’s abdomen is swollen and hard to the touch, and/or gagging and trying to vomit.
  • You see symptoms of heatstroke.
  • Your pregnant dog or cat has gone more than three to four hours between delivering puppies or kittens.